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Poster: hseamons Date: Apr 2, 2011 5:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear is Professor Frink from The Simpsons

"I have a strong tendency to use sculptural viewpoints in most things. For instance, when I'm working with sound, I work with sound in a three-dimensional fashion, which to me is palpably three-dimensional...it is physical, and you can walk through the hall and feel its shape and change. For instance, you experience a certain spacial form - dimensionality - if you listen to Old And In The Way with a set of headphones or something. Even with speakers: move around the room - you seem to be moving around the stage. It changes as you move around. It's like one time you'll be on one side, one time you'll be on another side, sometimes you'll be in the middle of it. It's always coherent. It's always three-dimensional, but this spacial image changes and your perception of it changes, but it seems palpable. It seems real, like a sculpture. It's the way I look at sound. It flashes back to that time when I saw the sound coming out of the speakers." -Bear



"I still only use two [audio] tracks. You don't need more than two because the way in which your ears work. You've only got two ears, but you can detect all kinds of different things with the information from two auditory sensing units - one on each side of your head. Those two units create a totally three-dimensional space in your mind, and that three-dimensional space which is created from your senses is as illusory as the reality of the sound. But what your ears do is they tap into the total matrix of what is in the room: all the energy that's in the room, whether it's bouncing off a wall or coming from the speaker or whatever, enters your ears and, inside, your brain sorts it out." -Bear






This post was modified by hseamons on 2011-04-03 00:56:33

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Apr 2, 2011 7:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear vs Bose

Bear vs Bose

I used Bose 901 speaker arrays to achieve the sound Bear describes, but on a much smaller scale. Bose conducted research into psychoacoustics and eventually clarified the importance of a dominance of reflected sound arriving at the head of the listener, a listening condition that is characteristic of live performances. This finding led to a revised speaker design in which eight of nine identical small mid-range drivers (with electronic equalization) were aimed at the wall behind the speaker while one driver was aimed forward, thus ensuring a dominance of reflected over direct sound in home listening spaces, replicating the dominant reflected sound fields listeners experience in live performances.

images.andale.com-120-115-2064065-img400x300-980017687bose-901-repair.jpg

The new pentagonal design, named the Model 901, was a very unconventional design for speakers at the time (which were generally either full-size floorstanding units or bookshelf type speakers). The Model 901 premiered in 1968 and was an immediate commercial success, and the Bose Corporation grew rapidly during the 1970s.

Bose model 800 speakers (and re-wired model 901 speakers) were excellent speaker arrays for PA systems. These Bose speaker arrays are aimed facing forward, into the audience. Bose speaker arrays were a "best choice" used by many musicians for accoustic instruments and vocals. You have Bear passionately mentioning accoustic sound for Old and In The Way.

Cowboy Bar - Jackson Hole, WY in 1976 - Vince Gill w/ Bluegrass Alliance
soundman Monte Barry using re-wired Bose 901s (in foreground) & Bose 800s
bluegrass-alliance-1976-02.jpg

Bear taking speaker arrays to a whole other level in 1974
dead-head_Monte-gd-70s-wall_of_sound-18.jpg

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Apr 2, 2011 2:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear is Professor Frink from The Simpsons

yes, EXACTLY! It's the sound! And, the "recordings" in this Archive run the gamut of those "sound" dimensions. I'd love to know if Bear ever knew how much INCREDIBLE sound they got in 1978 at Red Rocks Amphitheatre. This Cold Rain and Snow - 1978 AUD track by MOTB is beautiful.

13432_RedRocksAmphitheatre.jpg

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Poster: hseamons Date: Apr 2, 2011 5:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Bear is Professor Frink from The Simpsons

Had an out-of-body mushroom tea experience at Red Rocks. Can't say I'd like to relive the initial parts of it.

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